Garlic Helps Memory Loss

Eating raw garlic could help keep your memory sharp in old age by boosting gut health, study suggests

  • Older people with poor memories also tend to have less diverse gut microbiomes 
  • Garlic is thought to help encourage the growth of ‘good’ and more diverse gut bacteria 
  • Scientists at the University of Louisville found that older mice that were fed a raw garlic compound had better gut health, long- and short-term memory 

By Dailymail.com Reporter

Published: 09:00 EDT, 8 April 2019 | Updated: 09:42 EDT, 8 April 2019

Eating raw garlic could help prevent age-related memory loss suffered by Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients, scientists suggest.

The natural compound found in garlic – allyl sulfide – improves the health of bacteria in the stomach and also improve cognitive health in the elderly.

US scientists found the compound restores trillions of microorganisms – also known as gut microbiota – in the intestine.

Previous research has highlighted the importance of gut microbiota in maintaining health.

But few studies have explored gut health and age-related conditions.

Dr Jyotirmaya Behera at the University of Louisville in Kentucky said: ‘Our findings suggest that dietary administration of garlic containing allyl sulfide could help maintain healthy gut microorganisms and improve cognitive health in the elderly.’

A new study suggests that eating raw garlic as you age may improve gut health and, in turn, improve long- and short-term memory alike

A new study suggests that eating raw garlic as you age may improve gut health and, in turn, improve long- and short-term memory alike 

Co-author Dr Neetu Tyagi added: ‘The diversity of the gut microbiota is diminished in elderly people, a life stage when neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s develop and memory and cognitive abilities can decline.

‘We want to better understand how changes in the gut microbiota relate to ageing-associated cognitive decline.’

The team tested the theory on 24-month-old mice – an age which correlates to humans aged between 56 to 69-years-old.

The rodents were given allyl sulfide and compared to mice who were younger and the same age and not given the garlic compound.

The results revealed that the older mice who ate the supplement showed better long-term and short-term memory as well as a healthier gut compared to the other rodents who suffered impaired spatial memory.

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